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Making Sense(s) of the Workplace: Touch

Author:

TSK

01
December 2023
Clock
3
min read

Gone are the days when work was just work. And the office was just ‘the office’. Employees have evolved to want more, which means a workplace experience that mimics, and surpasses, what home life offers. How things feel can be a significant part of this.

Unsurprisingly, the humble sense of touch is easy to take for granted. Yet texture can impact on our mood, behaviour, brand connection, and more. Let’s look at how you can improve texture and touch in your workspace for better employee well-being and productivity.  

Layering basics

Linked with the visual sense, layering different textures creates a feast for your eyes. When materials are functional (for example, a relaxed breakout area with soft furnishings), layered textures make for an inviting environment.

Although not textural, glossy materials are a great way to add depth through reflection.

Colour-transforming texture

It’s not all about colour! With all the staring into screens we do, it’s easy to see colour as one-dimensional. But brands can be so much more than a digital colour helix code. If you have a particularly prominent red colour, you can balance that red with textural choices. 

Adding textural weave, carpet and yarn will convey a different message to that of your ‘flat’ red. Clever use of complementary colours often balances out a dominant colour. It’s about stepping back, knowing what message you want to convey and understanding how texture – the materials and the quantity of the materials – can elevate your colour choices.

Biophilic design

Although often associated with trees and the outdoors, biophilic design is centred around your senses, helping you feel connected to the natural environment. 

Texture plays a huge role in this. Let’s take sheet steel. Cut into it – create texture – and place a light behind it, and you’ll have dappled shade – something many of us perceive as relaxing.

Another clever texture technique is layering real and artificial planting. On a plant wall, you can have real plants at the forefront (which you would be able to touch) and artificial plants on the back layers. Your brain won’t know the difference. 

A sense of belonging

Drive through a quaint English village and you may well know where you are simply from the stones the buildings are constructed from. You can celebrate your local heritage by using local materials in your workplace.

Coastline-inspired textures from SAGA's office

Transforming space using brand elements

We transformed Saga’s workplace through colours and textures found around the local coastline.

Textural considerations like this enhance employee–brand connection.

Comfortable and thriving

Warmth and comfort are two basic human needs. You can bring a cosy feeling through textures and surfaces, such as wood and textiles.

While traditional offices tended to shy away from providing employees with too much comfort, fearing it would relax them too much, we now understand that pockets of accessible comfort can improve performance and productivity. Working from home during the pandemic demonstrated the positive impact this has. 

Positive behaviour

Texture has an impact on how we behave – and organisations can make good use of this to influence behaviour. Take fast food places. Certain materials can drive short, sharp interactions, ensuring quick table turnaround. Understanding the psychology of how your employees connect with your workplace environment allows you to design a highly functional and efficient space. 

Different strokes

Not everyone is going to like the same thing. Some people will like the feeling of sand because they love the beach – others will hate it! That’s why when it comes to design, it’s so important to move people through the design and make touchpoints that appeal to their unique needs.

Welcoming furnishings from Flutter's foyer

Soft textures from Flutter's Leeds office

When delivering a new office space for global gaming giant Flutter Entertainment, we designed each floor to stimulate different responses. Here’s what we did:

  • Used natural materials such as wood and plants to evoke a sense of calm in the café
  • Styled with soft furnishings, warm lighting and a TV above a fireplace to encourage people to relax in the the central lounge area
  • Replicated a traditional library – using traditional textures – to shape a space for employees to concentrate.

Feel your way

Texture forms a huge part of the spaces we design. From influencing behaviour to creating comfort, being aware of texture is critical to designing a workspace where employees thrive. So while the specific fabric of your breakout room sofas may not feel like a priority to you, to your workforce it could make a significant difference. 

Our top five texture considerations:

  • Layer different textures for depth and interest
  • Transform branded colours with textures – for instance, weave, carpet and yarn 
  • Use textures for warm, comfortable spaces where employees can relax
  • Define the function of the space and pick textures to complement this
  • Map out your workplace journey and understand how literal touchpoints can appeal to the diverse needs of your employees

Let’s talk textured solutions

Our team is always happy to discuss how we can help with your workspace solutions. You can get in touch with us here.

Download for free now

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

SHARE

No items found.

Making Sense(s) of the Workplace: Touch

Author:

TSK

01
December 2023
Clock
3
min read

Gone are the days when work was just work. And the office was just ‘the office’. Employees have evolved to want more, which means a workplace experience that mimics, and surpasses, what home life offers. How things feel can be a significant part of this.

Unsurprisingly, the humble sense of touch is easy to take for granted. Yet texture can impact on our mood, behaviour, brand connection, and more. Let’s look at how you can improve texture and touch in your workspace for better employee well-being and productivity.  

Layering basics

Linked with the visual sense, layering different textures creates a feast for your eyes. When materials are functional (for example, a relaxed breakout area with soft furnishings), layered textures make for an inviting environment.

Although not textural, glossy materials are a great way to add depth through reflection.

Colour-transforming texture

It’s not all about colour! With all the staring into screens we do, it’s easy to see colour as one-dimensional. But brands can be so much more than a digital colour helix code. If you have a particularly prominent red colour, you can balance that red with textural choices. 

Adding textural weave, carpet and yarn will convey a different message to that of your ‘flat’ red. Clever use of complementary colours often balances out a dominant colour. It’s about stepping back, knowing what message you want to convey and understanding how texture – the materials and the quantity of the materials – can elevate your colour choices.

Biophilic design

Although often associated with trees and the outdoors, biophilic design is centred around your senses, helping you feel connected to the natural environment. 

Texture plays a huge role in this. Let’s take sheet steel. Cut into it – create texture – and place a light behind it, and you’ll have dappled shade – something many of us perceive as relaxing.

Another clever texture technique is layering real and artificial planting. On a plant wall, you can have real plants at the forefront (which you would be able to touch) and artificial plants on the back layers. Your brain won’t know the difference. 

A sense of belonging

Drive through a quaint English village and you may well know where you are simply from the stones the buildings are constructed from. You can celebrate your local heritage by using local materials in your workplace.

Coastline-inspired textures from SAGA's office

Transforming space using brand elements

We transformed Saga’s workplace through colours and textures found around the local coastline.

Textural considerations like this enhance employee–brand connection.

Comfortable and thriving

Warmth and comfort are two basic human needs. You can bring a cosy feeling through textures and surfaces, such as wood and textiles.

While traditional offices tended to shy away from providing employees with too much comfort, fearing it would relax them too much, we now understand that pockets of accessible comfort can improve performance and productivity. Working from home during the pandemic demonstrated the positive impact this has. 

Positive behaviour

Texture has an impact on how we behave – and organisations can make good use of this to influence behaviour. Take fast food places. Certain materials can drive short, sharp interactions, ensuring quick table turnaround. Understanding the psychology of how your employees connect with your workplace environment allows you to design a highly functional and efficient space. 

Different strokes

Not everyone is going to like the same thing. Some people will like the feeling of sand because they love the beach – others will hate it! That’s why when it comes to design, it’s so important to move people through the design and make touchpoints that appeal to their unique needs.

Welcoming furnishings from Flutter's foyer

Soft textures from Flutter's Leeds office

When delivering a new office space for global gaming giant Flutter Entertainment, we designed each floor to stimulate different responses. Here’s what we did:

  • Used natural materials such as wood and plants to evoke a sense of calm in the café
  • Styled with soft furnishings, warm lighting and a TV above a fireplace to encourage people to relax in the the central lounge area
  • Replicated a traditional library – using traditional textures – to shape a space for employees to concentrate.

Feel your way

Texture forms a huge part of the spaces we design. From influencing behaviour to creating comfort, being aware of texture is critical to designing a workspace where employees thrive. So while the specific fabric of your breakout room sofas may not feel like a priority to you, to your workforce it could make a significant difference. 

Our top five texture considerations:

  • Layer different textures for depth and interest
  • Transform branded colours with textures – for instance, weave, carpet and yarn 
  • Use textures for warm, comfortable spaces where employees can relax
  • Define the function of the space and pick textures to complement this
  • Map out your workplace journey and understand how literal touchpoints can appeal to the diverse needs of your employees

Let’s talk textured solutions

Our team is always happy to discuss how we can help with your workspace solutions. You can get in touch with us here.

Download for free now

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Making sense of the workplace touch hero image

SHARE

Gone are the days when work was just work. And the office was just ‘the office’. Employees have evolved to want more, which means a workplace experience that mimics, and surpasses, what home life offers. How things feel can be a significant part of this.

Unsurprisingly, the humble sense of touch is easy to take for granted. Yet texture can impact on our mood, behaviour, brand connection, and more. Let’s look at how you can improve texture and touch in your workspace for better employee well-being and productivity.  

Layering basics

Linked with the visual sense, layering different textures creates a feast for your eyes. When materials are functional (for example, a relaxed breakout area with soft furnishings), layered textures make for an inviting environment.

Although not textural, glossy materials are a great way to add depth through reflection.

Colour-transforming texture

It’s not all about colour! With all the staring into screens we do, it’s easy to see colour as one-dimensional. But brands can be so much more than a digital colour helix code. If you have a particularly prominent red colour, you can balance that red with textural choices. 

Adding textural weave, carpet and yarn will convey a different message to that of your ‘flat’ red. Clever use of complementary colours often balances out a dominant colour. It’s about stepping back, knowing what message you want to convey and understanding how texture – the materials and the quantity of the materials – can elevate your colour choices.

Biophilic design

Although often associated with trees and the outdoors, biophilic design is centred around your senses, helping you feel connected to the natural environment. 

Texture plays a huge role in this. Let’s take sheet steel. Cut into it – create texture – and place a light behind it, and you’ll have dappled shade – something many of us perceive as relaxing.

Another clever texture technique is layering real and artificial planting. On a plant wall, you can have real plants at the forefront (which you would be able to touch) and artificial plants on the back layers. Your brain won’t know the difference. 

A sense of belonging

Drive through a quaint English village and you may well know where you are simply from the stones the buildings are constructed from. You can celebrate your local heritage by using local materials in your workplace.

Coastline-inspired textures from SAGA's office

Transforming space using brand elements

We transformed Saga’s workplace through colours and textures found around the local coastline.

Textural considerations like this enhance employee–brand connection.

Comfortable and thriving

Warmth and comfort are two basic human needs. You can bring a cosy feeling through textures and surfaces, such as wood and textiles.

While traditional offices tended to shy away from providing employees with too much comfort, fearing it would relax them too much, we now understand that pockets of accessible comfort can improve performance and productivity. Working from home during the pandemic demonstrated the positive impact this has. 

Positive behaviour

Texture has an impact on how we behave – and organisations can make good use of this to influence behaviour. Take fast food places. Certain materials can drive short, sharp interactions, ensuring quick table turnaround. Understanding the psychology of how your employees connect with your workplace environment allows you to design a highly functional and efficient space. 

Different strokes

Not everyone is going to like the same thing. Some people will like the feeling of sand because they love the beach – others will hate it! That’s why when it comes to design, it’s so important to move people through the design and make touchpoints that appeal to their unique needs.

Welcoming furnishings from Flutter's foyer

Soft textures from Flutter's Leeds office

When delivering a new office space for global gaming giant Flutter Entertainment, we designed each floor to stimulate different responses. Here’s what we did:

  • Used natural materials such as wood and plants to evoke a sense of calm in the café
  • Styled with soft furnishings, warm lighting and a TV above a fireplace to encourage people to relax in the the central lounge area
  • Replicated a traditional library – using traditional textures – to shape a space for employees to concentrate.

Feel your way

Texture forms a huge part of the spaces we design. From influencing behaviour to creating comfort, being aware of texture is critical to designing a workspace where employees thrive. So while the specific fabric of your breakout room sofas may not feel like a priority to you, to your workforce it could make a significant difference. 

Our top five texture considerations:

  • Layer different textures for depth and interest
  • Transform branded colours with textures – for instance, weave, carpet and yarn 
  • Use textures for warm, comfortable spaces where employees can relax
  • Define the function of the space and pick textures to complement this
  • Map out your workplace journey and understand how literal touchpoints can appeal to the diverse needs of your employees

Let’s talk textured solutions

Our team is always happy to discuss how we can help with your workspace solutions. You can get in touch with us here.

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